A person who is charged with domestic violence has a lot to contemplate following his or her arrest. Not only are they going to have to answer to the actual criminal charge, but they also likely will have to deal with the accompanying no-contact order that stems from the arrest. The alleged victim also may have filed an injunction petition, also known as a restraining order. These may prevent the accused from being able to return home, if they lived with the alleged victim, as well as bar the accused from contact with his or her children.

The challenges you may face go far beyond that if you’re convicted of a domestic violence charge. Collateral consequences can be far-reaching and difficult to live with. It’s imperative that you understand them so that you can adjust your defense strategy to address them.

Additionally, there are two other areas affecting some people charged with domestic violence. One of these is their career. The other is housing. If an employer or a landlord runs a background check, they may opt to fire you, not hire you or not allow you to move in to a rental property or subdivision.

In some cases, this type of charge might also impact child custody matters. This is possible before a conviction because the court must consider what’s best for the child. A judge may order supervised visitation to see your children until the court determines that you aren’t a threat.

A good criminal defense attorney can help you determine what consequences you’re facing because of the charge, so you can use that information to help you better handle your case as well as your life.