You were traveling a little faster than you wanted to because the driver behind you was tailgating. You sped up well over the speed limit to move over and get out of the way. As you merged into the other lane, you passed a police officer.

You slowed down back to the speed limit, but the officer was already behind you. When his lights came on, you were annoyed and probably nervous. He hadn’t gone after the other person who was speeding and tailgating, but instead came after you.

In that kind of situation, it can be frustrating to receive a speeding ticket. If you are receiving a speeding ticket, you should remember that you have a right to appear in court and described to a judge why you may have been speeding. You can defend against the ticket and, in some cases, have it dismissed or request a withhold of the points.

Simply paying the ticket at the courthouse or online with the county clerk almost always results in a judgment or guilt and points. And that often result in your insurance rate going up and other consequences that may even include a license suspension.

Whether you have a single ticket or multiple tickets, it’s always in your best interests to get legal advice and decide whether to go to court to fight them. You may be able to have the fees reduced or have the tickets thrown out completely. In some cases, you may need to appear in court to reduce the likelihood of losing your license or being heavily fined based on the number of offenses.

My website, www.verocriminaldefense.com, has information about how an attorney can help if you’re caught speeding or accused of speeding. You don’t have to plead guilty and paying the fine. There may be other options for you to consider.